Advice from a Wedding Photographer

TIPS FOR BRIDES AND GROOMS

Advice from a Wedding Photographer


Alisha is a Chicago-based wedding and lifestyle photographer as well as podcast host of The Freelance Hustle. She is an entrepreneur at heart and loves working with down-to-earth people all over the country as well as helping other freelance artists with their budding careers. You can follow her life and work at @alishatova. 

Advice from a Wedding Photographer

We interviewed Alisha – one of our favorite wedding photographers – whose images, beyond their raw beauty, capture candid and authentic moments. We wanted to know just how she does it and what advice she has for brides and grooms.

TIPS FOR BRIDES AND GROOMS

How'd you get your start in photography and what drew you to weddings in particular?
 
 I picked up my first camera when I was in high school and never really put it down. I've just always been drawn to the art, and it was so fun for me to connect with people in a different way then just talking – I had more fun taking their portraits. I think that's how I naturally moved into the wedding photography business. I knew it would be working with people and not stills. It's my way to connect with real life normal people, while putting my own mix of editorial and photo journalism twist on things. I also knew it would pay the bills! Being a starving artist was never my main objective.
 
 
What makes for a good photograph?
 
I think that's the beautiful thing about photography – it's all subjective and different styles, light, and composition make for beautiful work. But my main thing is that if it makes you feel something, then you've done it right. I have certain images engrained in my head forever, and those to me are the ones that feel lasting to me. As far as the technical stuff is concerned, knowing your light, how shadows and highlights hit a person's skin is crucial, as well as proper exposure settings, and editing that isn't a fad.
 
 
What advice do you have or brides and grooms when striking a pose? 
 
Practice at home. And when in doubt, just look at each other. It should be your safe place to come back to. The more in the moment you are with each other and trusting of the photographer you have in front of you, the better your photos will turn out.

TIPS FOR BRIDES AND GROOMS


The first look – what are the pros and cons ?
 
I'm a big fan of the first look! Of course it's totally up to you, but having a first look is both really special and really nice for your schedule. I usually push it more with late Fall / Winter weddings since we have way less daylight to work with. If you don't see each other until 6PM and the sun sets at 5:30, then you won't have any naturally lit photos with the two of you. It also helps get bridal party & family photos out of the way before the ceremony. But I will say, the most magical light is that last hour of daylight, and when couples don't do a first look, I usually have an easier time convincing them to take photos during that time, which is great!
 
 
What are some of your must-have shots to include that can often be overlooked in a shot list? 
 
I normally don't ask for shot lists from clients. Sometimes to me it shows lack of trust between you and the client. However, a Pinterest board of my work, or showing me shots that have spoken to you are always helpful to see what you gravitate towards! I also include a section on my questionnaire before the wedding where you can express photos you want to prioritize. But as far as 'must-have' shots? I'd probably say photos with your immediate family and grandparents, candids or formal. Because you never know how long everyone will be around <3

Alisha is a Chicago-based wedding and lifestyle photographer as well as podcast host of The Freelance Hustle. She is an entrepreneur at heart and loves working with down-to-earth people all over the country as well as helping other freelance artists with their budding careers. You can follow her life and work at @alishatova. 

We interviewed Alisha – one of our favorite wedding photographers – whose images, beyond their raw beauty, capture candid and authentic moments. We wanted to know just how she does it and what advice she has for brides and grooms.

Alisha is a Chicago-based wedding and lifestyle photographer as well as podcast host of The Freelance Hustle. She is an entrepreneur at heart and loves working with down-to-earth people all over the country as well as helping other freelance artists with their budding careers. You can follow her life and work at @alishatova. 

We interviewed Alisha – one of our favorite wedding photographers – whose images, beyond their raw beauty, capture candid and authentic moments. We wanted to know just how she does it and what advice she has for brides and grooms.

Any other words of wisdom for brides and grooms? 
 
Be intentional with the people you decide to work with. They all make up the look and feel of your day. Everything from your venue, to your florist, to your makeup artist all touches your day somehow, and it's important to like and respect them! It makes your day so much more fun and you'll be so relaxed knowing you have the right people helping you for your day.
 
 
What does 2019 look like for you (and how do we book you)?
 
My year is looking busy! I have 33 weddings all over the country. Some places I'm most excited about are Mexico and Santa Barbara. Hopefully more personal work and growth with my podcast (which you can follow along at wherever you listen to your podcasts!). I'm booked for weddings for 2019, but you can always reach out through my website to get in touch and talk about future shoots with me! I can't wait to hear from you.
How'd you get your start in photography and what drew you to weddings in particular?
 
 I picked up my first camera when I was in high school and never really put it down. I've just always been drawn to the art, and it was so fun for me to connect with people in a different way then just talking – I had more fun taking their portraits. I think that's how I naturally moved into the wedding photography business. I knew it would be working with people and not stills. It's my way to connect with real life normal people, while putting my own mix of editorial and photo journalism twist on things. I also knew it would pay the bills! Being a starving artist was never my main objective.
 
 
What makes for a good photograph?
 
I think that's the beautiful thing about photography – it's all subjective and different styles, light, and composition make for beautiful work. But my main thing is that if it makes you feel something, then you've done it right. I have certain images engrained in my head forever, and those to me are the ones that feel lasting to me. As far as the technical stuff is concerned, knowing your light, how shadows and highlights hit a person's skin is crucial, as well as proper exposure settings, and editing that isn't a fad.
 
 
What advice do you have or brides and grooms when striking a pose? 
 
Practice at home. And when in doubt, just look at each other. It should be your safe place to come back to. The more in the moment you are with each other and trusting of the photographer you have in front of you, the better your photos will turn out.
The first look – what are the pros and cons ?
 
I'm a big fan of the first look! Of course it's totally up to you, but having a first look is both really special and really nice for your schedule. I usually push it more with late Fall / Winter weddings since we have way less daylight to work with. If you don't see each other until 6PM and the sun sets at 5:30, then you won't have any naturally lit photos with the two of you. It also helps get bridal party & family photos out of the way before the ceremony. But I will say, the most magical light is that last hour of daylight, and when couples don't do a first look, I usually have an easier time convincing them to take photos during that time, which is great!
 
 
What are some of your must-have shots to include that can often be overlooked in a shot list? 
 
I normally don't ask for shot lists from clients. Sometimes to me it shows lack of trust between you and the client. However, a Pinterest board of my work, or showing me shots that have spoken to you are always helpful to see what you gravitate towards! I also include a section on my questionnaire before the wedding where you can express photos you want to prioritize. But as far as 'must-have' shots? I'd probably say photos with your immediate family and grandparents, candids or formal. Because you never know how long everyone will be around <3
Any other words of wisdom for brides and grooms? 
 
Be intentional with the people you decide to work with. They all make up the look and feel of your day. Everything from your venue, to your florist, to your makeup artist all touches your day somehow, and it's important to like and respect them! It makes your day so much more fun and you'll be so relaxed knowing you have the right people helping you for your day.
 
 
What does 2019 look like for you (and how do we book you)?
 
My year is looking busy! I have 33 weddings all over the country. Some places I'm most excited about are Mexico and Santa Barbara. Hopefully more personal work and growth with my podcast (which you can follow along at wherever you listen to your podcasts!). I'm booked for weddings for 2019, but you can always reach out through my website to get in touch and talk about future shoots with me! I can't wait to hear from you.
How'd you get your start in photography and what drew you to weddings in particular?
 
 I picked up my first camera when I was in high school and never really put it down. I've just always been drawn to the art, and it was so fun for me to connect with people in a different way then just talking – I had more fun taking their portraits. I think that's how I naturally moved into the wedding photography business. I knew it would be working with people and not stills. It's my way to connect with real life normal people, while putting my own mix of editorial and photo journalism twist on things. I also knew it would pay the bills! Being a starving artist was never my main objective.
 
 
What makes for a good photograph?
 
I think that's the beautiful thing about photography – it's all subjective and different styles, light, and composition make for beautiful work. But my main thing is that if it makes you feel something, then you've done it right. I have certain images engrained in my head forever, and those to me are the ones that feel lasting to me. As far as the technical stuff is concerned, knowing your light, how shadows and highlights hit a person's skin is crucial, as well as proper exposure settings, and editing that isn't a fad.
 
 
What advice do you have or brides and grooms when striking a pose? 
 
Practice at home. And when in doubt, just look at each other. It should be your safe place to come back to. The more in the moment you are with each other and trusting of the photographer you have in front of you, the better your photos will turn out.
The first look – what are the pros and cons ?
 
I'm a big fan of the first look! Of course it's totally up to you, but having a first look is both really special and really nice for your schedule. I usually push it more with late Fall / Winter weddings since we have way less daylight to work with. If you don't see each other until 6PM and the sun sets at 5:30, then you won't have any naturally lit photos with the two of you. It also helps get bridal party & family photos out of the way before the ceremony. But I will say, the most magical light is that last hour of daylight, and when couples don't do a first look, I usually have an easier time convincing them to take photos during that time, which is great!
 
 
What are some of your must-have shots to include that can often be overlooked in a shot list? 
 
I normally don't ask for shot lists from clients. Sometimes to me it shows lack of trust between you and the client. However, a Pinterest board of my work, or showing me shots that have spoken to you are always helpful to see what you gravitate towards! I also include a section on my questionnaire before the wedding where you can express photos you want to prioritize. But as far as 'must-have' shots? I'd probably say photos with your immediate family and grandparents, candids or formal. Because you never know how long everyone will be around <3 
Any other words of wisdom for brides and grooms? 
 
Be intentional with the people you decide to work with. They all make up the look and feel of your day. Everything from your venue, to your florist, to your makeup artist all touches your day somehow, and it's important to like and respect them! It makes your day so much more fun and you'll be so relaxed knowing you have the right people helping you for your day.
 
 
What does 2019 look like for you (and how do we book you)?
 
My year is looking busy! I have 33 weddings all over the country. Some places I'm most excited about are Mexico and Santa Barbara. Hopefully more personal work and growth with my podcast (which you can follow along at wherever you listen to your podcasts!). I'm booked for weddings for 2019, but you can always reach out through my website to get in touch and talk about future shoots with me! I can't wait to hear from you.

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